A massive study from Israel suggests older adults were far less likely to develop severe COVID-19 af …

a massive study from israel suggests older adults were far less likely to develop severe covid 19 after a booster shot but the finding carries major limitations

Sumary of A massive study from Israel suggests older adults were far less likely to develop severe COVID-19 after a booster shot, but the finding carries major limitations:

  • A third dose of Pfizer’s coronavirus vaccine dramatically reduces the risk of infection and severe illness for older adults, a new study found.
  • A team of researchers in Israel published the findings Wednesday in The New England Journal of Medicine.
  • Still, an expert urged caution on interpreting the findings, saying the study has major limitations.
  • Older adults in Israel who received a booster shot of Pfizer’s coronavirus vaccine were far less likely to get infected or develop severe illness, a massive study published on Wednesday found.
  • Including more than 1.1 million people who are 60 and older, the study looked at thousands of infections and hundreds of cases of severe illness, providing some of the most compelling evidence yet on the value of booster shots.
  • Israel started offering booster doses to its older population on July 30, and a group of researchers analyzed national healthcare records through the month of August.
  • Israeli study shows boosters cut the risk of infection and severe cases of COVID-19The main finding was the older population, when boosted, was 11 times less likely to get infected and 19.5 times less likely to get severely ill compared to similar people who had received two doses but not a booster shot.
  • The Biden administration has already said it plans to start offering booster shots to the general public on September 20, depending on OK’s from the FDA and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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